OD Today: 8 January 2009 (early edition)

January 8, 2009

Not an awful lot happened overnight, but we’ve got a bunch of Ed Dobson reaction stories, a new salvo in the Jesus Wants To Save Christians review battle, and more controversy surrounding Mark Driscoll.

  1. Here’s the Ed Dobson appearance on Good Morning America; it looks for all the world like he’s there to push someone else’s book.
  2. Comments singling out the fact that Dobson kept kosher as part of his “Jesus lifestyle.” “Am I the only one who finds it ironic that gentile Christians, of whom the unclean food was a symbol are now flocking back to Kosher living? This is a perfect picture of the state of Graceless moralistic faith in general, as moralism is our attempt to make clean what God has already declared to be.”
  3. Mike Wittmer also comments on Ed Dobson “Ed’s project for the past year seems rather silly … Ed’s national admission that he frequently had beers in pubs blows a big hole through Cornerstone University’s lifestyle statement”
  4. And finally, something I rarely do: a link from the Talking Points Memo weblog about Dobson’s admission he voted for Barack Obama.

Okay. Now for the usual batch of links.

  1. Kent Hovind‘s sentence for tax evasion has been upheld.
  2. Scott Ragan links to Harold Ambler’s piece at the Huffington Post. This is the second link to this article in as many days, all about Ambler calling out Al Gore regarding global warming. “By the way, your contention that the Arctic basin will be “ice free” in summer within five years (which you said last month in Germany), is one of the most demonstrably false comments you have dared to make.”
  3. Lighthouse Trails links to a New American article in which Henry Kissinger encourages the President-Elect to pursue a new world order. “he can give new impetus to American foreign policy … I think that his task will be to develop an overall strategy for America in this period, when really a ‘new world order’ can be created. It’s a great opportunity. It isn’t such a crisis.”
  4. Lighthouse Trails copies a Warren Smith article, but I can’t find the original anywhere. “Many Christian leaders these days are so sure that what they are hearing and experiencing is from God, they are rarely testing the spirits, or even considering the possibility that they are being deceived.” Smith doesn’t name any of these leaders, etc.
  5. Jerry at CRN.Info continues his review of Jesus Wants To Save Christians, by Rob Bell and Don Golden.”Rob Bell and Don Golden continue to insist, in chapter two, Get Down Your Harps, that God is interested in a relationship with his people. In this chapter, relationship is spoken of in terms of a marriage. They also continue to insist that God’s salvation is much bigger than we sometimes want to admit-and that it has always been much bigger than the people Israel wanted to admit-that it is for all. … Some of you may wish to highlight other aspects of what they are saying, but rest assured, I did not personally pick up any hints whatsoever that this was a universal proposition guaranteeing salvation for everyone, everywhere.”
  6. Chris Lyons comments on Ewan Souter’s decision to take down his church’s crucifix: “I think that all too often we Christians become so obsessed with the cross (Jesus’ death) that we forget the true “uplifting and inspiring symbol” given to us by Jesus – the empty tomb. Perhaps, instead of adorning our churches with empty crosses – literally and sometimes figuratively – we’d be more accurate by decorating them with a stone that has been rolled away…”
  7. John Baker picks up the Ft Lauderdale Muslim protest, where some protestors called for the extermination of the Jews.

And now, a complicated trail regarding Mark Dricoll’s comments on Jesus the Evangelist:

  1. Mark Driscoll’s original comments: “the fact that Jesus remains to this day an active evangelist is of great encouragement to me personally. It means that children who are aborted in the womb, those mentally incapable of understanding the gospel, and those people who have lived in times and places that missionaries did not visit are not necessarily beyond the hope of salvation. Indeed, Jesus could visit and save anyone anywhere because He remains The Evangelist.”
  2. Timmy Brister parses these comments: “what is so confusing to me is that Driscoll’s response could be taken potentially all three ways:  (1) post-mortem evangelism because Jesus will “evangelize” them Himself, presumably after they die; (2) a variation of inclusivism; or (3) a form of soft exclusivism where Jesus reveals Himself to people in dreams or visions savingly.  I am inclined that, given Driscoll’s charismatic beliefs (or mysticism) and theological influences, he would likely be in the third category. … Inasmuch as Driscoll hopes that the unevangelized will be evangelized by Jesus, I hope that the unevangelized will also be discipled by Jesus because there will be no one around to do that work. … ironically, creates a divide between Christ and His Great Commission.”
  3. Puritan Reformed offers abbreviated comments: “Barring the mentally handicapped and the unborn, the mention of unreached peoples and people groups is very troubling. Is the Gospel necessary unto salvation, or can salvation be mediated by some sort of supernatural encounter apart from the Scriptures and cognitive belief in Christ? Something stinks over in the New Calvinist camp, that’s for sure.”
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