Posts Tagged ‘Berit Kjos’

OD Today: 20 January 2009 (late edition)

January 20, 2009

Same day, same issues, more or less: lots of reaction to the Obama inaugural. I’m facing a long night, so I’m posting a short update here.

  1. Ingrid Schlueter quotes Albert Mohler on American religion, meaning (more or less) Christianity as it is filtered through American values. “As much as Christians in this blessed nation should respect and cherish our democratic ideals and system of government, we must keep ever in mind that the Kingdom of God is ruled by a higher and infinitely more perfect law and system of governance. Be warned: God is not running for office, and heaven is not a democracy.”
  2. Tim Challies offers links a la carte as he does most every day; a couple of them are “1.20.09” related, including John Piper‘s advice on being pro-life under a pro-choice president (circa 1992).
  3. Lighthouse Trails excerpts an article by Berit Kjos warning against creeping Socialism. Kjos connects a number of dots (Hitler, Stalin, Rick Warren, and Barack Obama), but mostly warns against (if I am reading her correctly) the quest for solidarity and common ground as ingredients in a recipe for totalitarianism.
  4. Terry Mattingly parses some numbers regarding the popularity of Barack Obama’s decision to invite Rick Warren to pray at his inauguration. “By the way, did I read that right? Did a higher percentage of DEMOCRATS favor the Warren choice than Republicans?”
  5. Confessing Lutheran Mollie Hemingway offers yet another take on more or less the same story we’ve seen in the 2004 Cathleen Falsani interview with Barack Obama and related articles. “The ultimate civil religion president, perhaps?”
  6. Desert Pastor recaps, comments on Rick Warren’s prayer. “Good ending by concluding in the name of Jesus (and the inclusion of the Muslim, Spanish, and Hebrew variations of Jesus). I am just afraid that this man has chosen to misrepresent the true nature of God and His Only Begotten Son, the Lord Jesus Christ!”
  7. Ken Silva puts Queermergent into context within his ongoing study of Phyllis Tickle and the Emergent Church, also mentions Peter Rollins and Adele Sakler.
  8. John Sexton excerpts Barack Obama’s inaugural address. “Will he deliver [safety] or will he make the same mistakes previous Democratic Presidents have made? With Gaza in flames and Iran on the verge of constructing its first nukes, I think we’ll know soon enough.”
  9. Terry Mattingly catches ABC News fumbling a Rick Warren reference to a “great cloud of witnesses” as being a reference to Martin Luther King Jr.
  10. Rich at Take Up Your Cross offers a term for a religion with Barack Obama as its Messiah: “Obamianity.” “In the minds of many people, our new President has been elevated to an almost Messiah-like status.”
  11. Christine at Talk Wisdom takes up the question of Bible Codes referring to the new President. I’d completely forgotten about Bible Codes. Completely.

Why didn’t somebody at one of the the various conservative news sources dig up the Falsani interview in (say) September 2008?

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OD Today: 29 December 2008

December 29, 2008

I’m still trying to do some backing and filling on the KJV Only movement, so a couple of today’s links are fairly old. I’m still looking for Pro-KJV-Only weblogs and/or YouTube streams; most everything seems to be from KJV-Only detractors.

  • YouTube user TellittoJesus takes on KJV Only, particularly Bill Bradley’s book Purified Seven Times. He considers the KJV Only Movement “the spirit of the Antichrist.”
  • Jerry at CRN.Info quotes from this article by William Murchison asking if looking to older stages in a particular Christian tradition is helpful if that tradition doesn’t faithfully represent Jesus and His teachings. Some coarse language due to a quote from a book by Robert Penn Warren.
  • Blogger KittyKit quotes this article by Thomas Horn: “As a Christian researcher and author of two books on the New Age, I find the increasing regularity of UFO sightings prophetically intriguing,” and in another post quotes this older editorial on Anne Rice and vampires.
  • John Baker quotes without comment this article from CNS News about 2009 being a crucial year in the debate about homosexuality and human rights. “Homosexuality is not a human right, [Gary] Bauer said.”
  • John Baker links with scripture verses but no additional comments to this response by someone referred to only by the initials “S.S.” to this announcement of an Assemblies of God missions drive called Invasion of America with the Gospel. The original announcement by Zollie Smith Jr, Executive Director of Missions for the Assemblies of God, includes the sentence “No one deserves to spend eternity in the lake of fire.” I’m not going to try to parse all the buzzwords and name-calling here to figure out if this is a sign of creeping Universalism or just a poor choice of words.
  • Dwayna Litz links to Nicholas Jackson’s column at News With Views with a suggested prayer for Rick Warren to pray at Barack Obama‘s inauguration.
  • Dwayna Litz offers links for people who are witnessing to cultists: Witnesses for Jesus, Inc. and Walter Martin’s Religious InfoNet.
  • Brian Thornton congratulates Focus on the Family for pulling its CitizenLink article promoting Glenn Beck’s book The Christmas Sweater, links to this Drew Zahn article at World Net Daily. Zahn’s piece does a poor job of explaining the differences between Mormon and evangelical Christian theology, summarizes Beck’s book, quotes Joel Campbell of the Mormon Times, and notes that World Net Daily is selling Beck’s book. I’m going to pass on the chance to say World Net Daily is “promoting Mormonism,” but that looks like profiteering to me.
  • Dwayna Litz recommends Jeff Sharlet‘s book The Family, and says she’s ordering a copy tonight. Jeff Sharlet has written several long-form pieces on the Religious Right, all of which merit reading. He’s one of the few mainstream journalists I’ve found who seems to speak the language, but he’s not personally a conservative Christian and his objections to what he’s seeing and reporting can be a bit difficult to tease out from time to time. His primary Web outlet is The Revealer.
  • ODM detractor Jerry at CRN.Info engages in the first part of a discussion with Jesus Wants To Save Christians, by Rob Bell and Don Golden.
  • Brian Thornton comments on Rick Warren’s “gay partnership” comment, calls it heresy.
  • James White shares a video from Phoenix Reformed Baptist Church, where he responds to Bart Ehrman and John Dominic Crossans, and their claims that Mark and Luke present substantially different accounts of Jesus’s crucifixion. The video is forty-three minutes long, and I have to admit I haven’t watched it all. The direct link to the YouTube video is here.
  • Lighthouse Trails comments on a Christianity Today interview with Franklin Graham regarding Rick Warren’s opportunity to pray at the Barack Obama inauguration. “We present this article as an example of how Christian leaders (such as Graham) are not warning the body of Christ about Rick Warren’s teachings and beliefs that include a three-legged global peace plan and the new reformation/new spirituality.”
  • John Sexton picks up the Seabreeze Church financial situation. He attended this church and was part of the building search committee, and he fills in details missing from the Times story; he blames the pastor, Bevan Unrau: “The senior pastor (forlorn man) spent four months at the end of 2007 talking about his authority. We heard about it at a men’s retreat, then in sermons, then in leadership meetings. He made it clear to everyone that he was the sole decision maker for the church. Then he preceded to fire the church secretary, the youth pastor and the worship pastor. I quit shortly thereafter. Other quit too. About 150 people left the church over the next three months. And, surprise, the church began to struggle financially.” For the record, I don’t think there is enough of this sort of name-naming when a church is in trouble: Sexton relates fact claims that can be verified or falsified, and that puts his account head and shoulders above most of the troubled-church narratives I’ve read and heard.
  • Sharon Lindbloom suggests that the LDS Church is mixing Joseph Smith into their Christmas observance, in a role that is similar to the way Santa Claus is mixed into Christmas observance in the broader culture.
  • John Baker quotes an article from the Pak Tribune that claims Prince Charles of England says the “clash of civilizations could be averted by following the teaching of Islam and Quran.” For the record, the article is not a direct quote. In the comments there’s this link with comment by Tony Blair: “‘In the first place, you understand what it means to believe. What you often find is that you immediately have something in common with another person of faith, even if he belongs to a different religion. As well as that, one is interested in other religions. One’s motivation is greater. I regularly read the Koran, practically every day,’ Blair told the interviewer. He said the Prophet Mohammed had been ‘an enormously civilizing force.'”
  • Michael Davis links and comments regarding a One News Now story regarding an ACLU lawsuit over explicitly Christian prayers at the Forsythe County, North Carolina board meetings. Davis appeals to the example of the framers of the Constitution: “Apparently, those who wrote the Constitution in the first place did not think that prayer was a violation of their efforts and many but not all of the prayers did reference Jesus.”
  • fourpointer at Defending Contending offers the twenty-second article in a series of fifty responses to Mormon questions, regarding whether Mormons are monotheistic, polytheistic, or as fourpointer states, henotheistic.
  • John Baker copies an article from Berit Kjos, relating Robert Muller’s World Peace Plan 2010. The original appears to be here.
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Rick Warren and the Council on Foreign Relations

December 21, 2008

This is a new one by me; it wouldn’t have occurred to me to ask whether a megachurch pastor, even one who has written a best-selling book, was a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. But here it is:

  • At Extreme Theology
  • At World Net Daily, in an article written by founder Joseph Farah, where he cites a private email exchange between himself and Warren, and a denial by John Mogush, who says Warren was asked and declined
  • Berit Kjos cites the article by Farah, but only the claim by Farah, not the counterclaim by Mogush
  • Warren himself claims to have been invited to speak to the Council on Foreign Relations, but does not mention an invitation, much less membership.
  • Again from Joseph Farah, in an earlier article citing the same email exchange
  • A post by Hannah Bell here refers to Rich Warren and the CFR in its subject line, but as best I can tell it doesn’t connect the dots. See also here.
  • Another article by Berit Kjos mentions Warren having spoken to the CFR, but just asks rhetorical questions.

The whole thing reminds me of a certain book by Gary Allen.

Manna Storehouse story

December 21, 2008

I can’t seem to find the earliest stories regarding the raid on Manna Storehouse in LaGrange, Ohio. The Google News links are here; they only go back to December 5th, while the raid apparently occurred on December 1st. A commenter named Don Neeper posted about it on December 2nd at The Complete Patient, a weblog devoted to health, food, and related business issues. The best coverage from a co-op point of view is probably at The Bovine, a weblog devoted to the cause of “access to raw milk,” where it appeared on December 3rd.

From there it made the jump to Berit Kjos’s website on December 4th, and from there after updates etc. to e.g. Dwayna Litz’s weblog and Lighthouse Trails.

The news articles focus on the question of whether the Stowers were operating a business without a license. The milk people see this as the Ohio Department of Agriculture acting on behalf of corporate food interests, and Kjos et al focus on the presence of guns, the legality of search and seizure, with a suggestion that this is the face of things to come from the United Nations, Barack Obama, and assorted paramilitary groups.

I haven’t read anything to suggest what the Stowers’ denominational affiliation is.

Note use of scare quotes in Cleveland Plain Dealer story, which presents the story from the point of view of the Lorain County Sheriff’s Office (December 10).

Farm And Dairy article regarding lawsuit doesn’t mention SWAT teams, has no scare quotes around the word “raid” (December 19).