Posts Tagged ‘Islam’

OD Today: 23 January 2009 (early edition)

January 23, 2009

Yesterday’s late update was very late, so there isn’t a lot new overnight. Mostly a continuation of ongoing stories, with a couple of surprises, including a reference to Henry Blackaby.

  1. Mike Ratliff continues his series looking forward to cultural changes under the Obama administration and their implications for conservative Christians. “I am convinced that how we deal with the Obama administration during this time is a huge part of our sanctification. We must balance out what we are commanded to do in that we must be good citizens, but we must also be obedient to God in all things. Therefore, when our government attempts to enforce unrighteousness upon us we have no choice except to take a stand in obedience to God.”
  2. Kit offers the collection of Rick Warren connections collected by Sandy Simpson. The original is here, and appears to be five years old. I wonder what Rick Warren’s been up to since then?
  3. Darryl Foster calls out Frederick Haynes for speaking at the National Black Justice Coalition’s Black Church Summit. “The Haynes engagement signals the gay church movement’s continued quest to incorporate mainstream false teachers into its mission. False teachers love false christian movements.”
  4. Dwayna Litz reflects on homosexuals and transgenders in the New York area. “I only saw him as a person in need of Jesus. Contrary to what the homosexuals believe, not all Christians hate them.”
  5. Phil Perkins continues his series on the intellectual shortcomings of American evangelicalism with an article on subjectivism, calls Henry Blackaby a heretic. “Churches, schools, and denominations who would never have been guilty of teaching the subjectivism of Barth or Schleiermacher embraced the Evangelical language and style of Blackaby. He was a Southern Baptist preacher, so most couldn’t imagine that he was liberal. But he was heretical.”
  6. Steve Camp parses Rick Warren’s inaugural prayer. “Did he invoke the name of Jesus as he promised? Barely; and with all the conviction that playing politics with God could muster, Mr. Purpose Driven watered-down his prayer …”
  7. Colin Smith offers a side-by-side comparison between particular surahs from the Koran and corresponding passages from the Old Testament. “the Qur’an draws particularly from stories concerning Old Testament prophets to illustrate Muhammad’s warnings, and teach regarding obedience and faithfulness to Allah and his commands. There are two things particularly noteworthy about the Qur’anic use of the Old Testament: first, the stories are always presented as teaching tools to make a present-day (at least for Muhammad) point; second, they are rarely, if ever, presented without embellishment–sometimes to the point where the original Old Testament story is barely discernible.”
  8. Emily H. at Grace in the Triad takes on Shane Claiborne and the New Monastics. “The only problem with the New Monasticism movement is its foundation–and therefore everything built upon the foundation. There is no clear theological basis for New Monasticism; they accept anything & everything that is nominally Christian, promoting what Pastor Dustin describes as a “buffet bar” mentality to Christianity.”
  9. And finally, Mollie Hemingway reports on reporting on the March for Life. “In some cases — notably the Washington Post in the last couple of years — coverage of pro-life events has improved. In other cases, not so much. Each year pro-life march participants joke — a lot — about how their numbers are laughably under-counted. They’ll know, say, that they themselves came in a caravan of 5,000 people in rented buses from Pittsburgh but they’ll read the paper the next day describe the entire crowd as consisting of “thousands.””
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OD Today: 20 January 2009 (bonus edition)

January 20, 2009

So many links. So little time. I wasn’t online the last time a Democrat became President, so I have nothing to compare today to.

  1. Ingrid Schlueter comments on a World Net Daily story about the new Administration’s agenda regarding hate crimes. “I believe it’s time to inject a little cold reality into some minds. Change is underway, and it will cost all of us who believe what the Bible says about homosexuality.” This article caught on like wildfire today and ended up in so many places I lost track (whitehouse.gov).
  2. Thomas Heringer weighs in, promises to resist. “Problem is I doubt that the present idiot in the WH feels the same, in fact I think he wants us all to follow like a blind heard of sheep. … My first grievance is how he took the nomination and used tactics reminiscent of the Nazi’s. I pray that he fails in everything he tries to do and for what it is worth that America falls even deeper into the mess we have created for ourselves and I ask God in heaven to judge America starting with Obama.”
  3. Michael Davis calls Obama “a new President to pray for.”
  4. Brian Thornton echoes Albert Mohler‘s prayer for Barack Obama. “Father, lead him to see abortion, not as a matter of misconstrued rights, but as a murderous violation of the right to life. May he come to see every aborted life as a violation of human dignity and every abortion as an abhorrent blight upon this nation’s moral witness.”
  5. Jennifer O’Hara gives Obama a failing grade for today’s speech.
  6. Timmy Brister shares the text of Rick Warren’s prayer, with video (YouTube).
  7. John Baker finds Islamic themes in Warren’s prayer. “The meaning of the phrase: “Allah is compassionate and merciful” has a completely different meaning within the context of Islam and the Qur’an than the phrase: “God is compassionate and merciful” would have within the context of Christianity and The Bible. Finally with Rick Warren’s history he has made it pretty clear that he conisders “Allah” as one and the same as The God of the Bible.”
  8. Miriam Franklin is troubled by the use of the phrases “new age” and “new era” in Obama’s inaugural address.
  9. Bill Wilson focuses on Eugene Robinson, says he’s evidence of national heresy. “What has occurred is the cursing of our nation and its leadership with heresy.”
  10. Christian Worldview/David Wheaton shares the full text of Albert Mohler’s prayer for Obama.
  11. Daniel Pulliam mentions Sharon Watkins’s prayer at the inauguration, and includes a link to an inaugural prayer summary article by Rachel Zoll. Names, names, names. Zoll hits all the facts really quickly, and I defy anybody to find a mistake in anything she writes.
  12. Orrin Judd picks up an article from Daniel Finklestein of the Times of London, on the “no we can’t” Obama we didn’t see on the campaign trail. “He described a nation at war, an economy badly weakened, a collective failure to make hard choices. And while the new President promised to face these difficulties, he was extremely careful not to promise to eliminate them.”
  13. Job at Jesus Christology gives a contrary opinion regarding Joseph Farah’s “Pray Obama Fails” campaign. “So the difference between Caesar when Paul was writing Romans and Obama right now is what exactly? … Well Joe Farah, I say the same about you. The reason is that you are willfully creating confusion between using spiritual warfare, evangelism, foretelling and forthtelling, etc. to oppose evil rulers and their policies, and between being a sinful seditionist.”
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OD Today: 8 January 2009 (early edition)

January 8, 2009

Not an awful lot happened overnight, but we’ve got a bunch of Ed Dobson reaction stories, a new salvo in the Jesus Wants To Save Christians review battle, and more controversy surrounding Mark Driscoll.

  1. Here’s the Ed Dobson appearance on Good Morning America; it looks for all the world like he’s there to push someone else’s book.
  2. Comments singling out the fact that Dobson kept kosher as part of his “Jesus lifestyle.” “Am I the only one who finds it ironic that gentile Christians, of whom the unclean food was a symbol are now flocking back to Kosher living? This is a perfect picture of the state of Graceless moralistic faith in general, as moralism is our attempt to make clean what God has already declared to be.”
  3. Mike Wittmer also comments on Ed Dobson “Ed’s project for the past year seems rather silly … Ed’s national admission that he frequently had beers in pubs blows a big hole through Cornerstone University’s lifestyle statement”
  4. And finally, something I rarely do: a link from the Talking Points Memo weblog about Dobson’s admission he voted for Barack Obama.

Okay. Now for the usual batch of links.

  1. Kent Hovind‘s sentence for tax evasion has been upheld.
  2. Scott Ragan links to Harold Ambler’s piece at the Huffington Post. This is the second link to this article in as many days, all about Ambler calling out Al Gore regarding global warming. “By the way, your contention that the Arctic basin will be “ice free” in summer within five years (which you said last month in Germany), is one of the most demonstrably false comments you have dared to make.”
  3. Lighthouse Trails links to a New American article in which Henry Kissinger encourages the President-Elect to pursue a new world order. “he can give new impetus to American foreign policy … I think that his task will be to develop an overall strategy for America in this period, when really a ‘new world order’ can be created. It’s a great opportunity. It isn’t such a crisis.”
  4. Lighthouse Trails copies a Warren Smith article, but I can’t find the original anywhere. “Many Christian leaders these days are so sure that what they are hearing and experiencing is from God, they are rarely testing the spirits, or even considering the possibility that they are being deceived.” Smith doesn’t name any of these leaders, etc.
  5. Jerry at CRN.Info continues his review of Jesus Wants To Save Christians, by Rob Bell and Don Golden.”Rob Bell and Don Golden continue to insist, in chapter two, Get Down Your Harps, that God is interested in a relationship with his people. In this chapter, relationship is spoken of in terms of a marriage. They also continue to insist that God’s salvation is much bigger than we sometimes want to admit-and that it has always been much bigger than the people Israel wanted to admit-that it is for all. … Some of you may wish to highlight other aspects of what they are saying, but rest assured, I did not personally pick up any hints whatsoever that this was a universal proposition guaranteeing salvation for everyone, everywhere.”
  6. Chris Lyons comments on Ewan Souter’s decision to take down his church’s crucifix: “I think that all too often we Christians become so obsessed with the cross (Jesus’ death) that we forget the true “uplifting and inspiring symbol” given to us by Jesus – the empty tomb. Perhaps, instead of adorning our churches with empty crosses – literally and sometimes figuratively – we’d be more accurate by decorating them with a stone that has been rolled away…”
  7. John Baker picks up the Ft Lauderdale Muslim protest, where some protestors called for the extermination of the Jews.

And now, a complicated trail regarding Mark Dricoll’s comments on Jesus the Evangelist:

  1. Mark Driscoll’s original comments: “the fact that Jesus remains to this day an active evangelist is of great encouragement to me personally. It means that children who are aborted in the womb, those mentally incapable of understanding the gospel, and those people who have lived in times and places that missionaries did not visit are not necessarily beyond the hope of salvation. Indeed, Jesus could visit and save anyone anywhere because He remains The Evangelist.”
  2. Timmy Brister parses these comments: “what is so confusing to me is that Driscoll’s response could be taken potentially all three ways:  (1) post-mortem evangelism because Jesus will “evangelize” them Himself, presumably after they die; (2) a variation of inclusivism; or (3) a form of soft exclusivism where Jesus reveals Himself to people in dreams or visions savingly.  I am inclined that, given Driscoll’s charismatic beliefs (or mysticism) and theological influences, he would likely be in the third category. … Inasmuch as Driscoll hopes that the unevangelized will be evangelized by Jesus, I hope that the unevangelized will also be discipled by Jesus because there will be no one around to do that work. … ironically, creates a divide between Christ and His Great Commission.”
  3. Puritan Reformed offers abbreviated comments: “Barring the mentally handicapped and the unborn, the mention of unreached peoples and people groups is very troubling. Is the Gospel necessary unto salvation, or can salvation be mediated by some sort of supernatural encounter apart from the Scriptures and cognitive belief in Christ? Something stinks over in the New Calvinist camp, that’s for sure.”

OD Today: 7 January 2009 (late edition)

January 7, 2009

Some recurring stories here (virginity pledges, Jett Travolta, John Crowder, N. T. Wright, and of course Rick Warren) and some new stuff. Honestly: had you ever heard of E. A. Adeboye before today?

I was going to hang onto this for several more hours, but then the SGM story appeared again. See item 15 below.

  1. I realize ODMs took the press coverage at face value and moved on, but William McGurn at the Wall Street Journal dug into the “virginity pledge” stories and came away with several bullets. “virginity pledging teens were considerably more conservative in their overall sexual behaviors than teens in general — a fact that many media reports have missed cold.”
  2. The death of Jett Travolta is still a story.
  3. Chris Rosebrough interprets Jesus’s interpretation of Scripture. “Since Jesus proved His claim to being the One True God in human flesh by raising Himself from the dead, there is no greater authority, living or dead on the subject of the Bible than Him.
  4. Miriam Franklin digs into E. A. Adeboye’s theology. “When googling for information on Adeboye and RCCG, there is obviousy great affection and love for Daddy GO among his supporters. And there is nothing wrong with love or respect where it is due. But the type and also the level of this adoration is something else, and his elevation onto a pedestal seems very unhealthy indeed. And this idolatry seems to be widespread and not just the opinion of a few.”
  5. Ingrid Schlueter links to a Star Parker editorial. “I doubt that Billy Graham would see this in the spirit of his own calling to bring the gospel to all who would listen. Nor would I see the Rev. Graham signing onto the Evangelical Climate Initiative, as has Rick Warren.”
  6. Ingrid Schlueter reminds us who Neale Donald Walsch is, links to a story in which he “now says he made a mistake in believing the story was something that had actually come from his personal experience.”
  7. Defending Contending plugs Voddie Baucham’s book Family Driven Faith. “Voddie sounds the call for parents to take back their biblical responsibilities as the primary spiritual mentors and shepherds of their children. He also calls for the church to not only stop interfering and usurping parents’ authority, but to quit dividing and segregating the family.”
  8. Michael Davis on Salah Sultan: “There is freedom of religion in this country and Muslims are free to look forward to and hope that one day America will become a Muslim nation with sharia law. However, that would mean the destruction of America as we know it and actions toward such a cause may cross the line between freedom of religion and sedition.”
  9. Denise at Surph’s Side quotes Arthur Pink, applies his comments to Rick Warren.
  10. John Baker follows suit regarding John Crowder and the Sons of Thunder.
  11. La Shawn Barber quotes Heather McDonald regarding murder rates among black Americans. “Instead of sending “dissenting” e-mail to me or Heather Mac Donald, send it to the men doing the killing and the men and women dooming black babies to fatherless childhoods. They deserve your scorn. We don’t.”
  12. Frank Turk on essentials and inessentials, especially miracles. “It doesn’t seek to get them to first, for example, accept a 6-day creation before showing them that the Law says they are sinful people under condemnation.”
  13. David Reagan offers the second installment regarding the question of whether the Antichrist is a Muslim. “In his book, Goodman argues that the Antichrist will rise from the Eastern wing of the old Roman Empire, coming from the ancient Greek sphere of influence that was incorporated into that empire. Getting even more specific, he argues that the Antichrist will come from the Seleucid area of the Greek sphere — specifically, from Assyria, meaning either modern-day Syria or Iraq.”
  14. James White warns regarding N. T. Wright’s new book on justification. “It is vitally important to note that the Reformation doctrine of justification was forged out of the highest view of Scripture, while modern viewpoints come forth from a far more skeptical, man-centered perspective.”
  15. Christian Research Network links to both Sovereign Grace Ministries and SGM Survivors. I would encourage fair-minded readers not to decide who is right on the basis of doctrinal statements, but rather read through the Noel’s Story thread(s) (1, 2, 3). There is without doubt some plain-vanilla axe-grinding etc. in the comments, but having read the main story and the first 150 or so comments I would have to say that posters Noel and Grizzly present a coherent-to-convincing story alleging that church leadership in one Virginia (Fairfax?) SGM church knowingly allowed an admitted child molestor to work in their nursery. I haven’t read the other thousand or so comments, so I can’t comment on the rest of the thread, etc.
  16. Brian Thornton picks up the virginity pledges story. “Let’s be honest, though. Teens are going to have sex, in my opinion, almost regardless of what is presented to them, whether they are sex educated, gospel informed, or take a vow of virginity or not. Maybe the best prevention is to not allow them so much flexibility and free time away from home.” I’m not going to try to get his comments to mesh with the McGurn/WSJ analysis above.

OD Today: 6 January 2009 (late edition)

January 6, 2009

This is a little early for a late edition, but I’ve got a lot to do this afternoon. More ReJesus, more Islam, and a cameo by Rick Warren. The best of the bunch is the second-least likely: one of the ODM detractors says global warming is done.

  1. Student of megachurchs Ed Stetzer repeats an article he wrote for the Nashville Tennessean on how to stop the decline of the Southern Baptist Convention. “Yet, such change will require an openness to other approaches to church and ministry from different cultures and generations. Openness will be difficult since preaching against other ways of doing church still gets the “big amen” at the SBC meeting– even though the “Amen Corner” is getting older and smaller every year. If we share a common theology, we need to hold out a chair and ask new generations and ethnicities to sit at the table of leadership. We need leadership change.”
  2. Ed Stetzer interviews Alan Hirsch, co-author of ReJesus. “Every time we attempt to image God, be it mental or metal, we limit him and thereby seek to control him. We must always allow Jesus to be beyond any stereotype that we might wish to make of him.”
  3. Dan Phillips on analysis paralysis. “It’s just that we’ve moved the focus from my obeying right, in faith and by grace (which is an explicitly Biblical focus), to my yielding right (which is not). And I still fail, because I have to strike the right mystical attitude to shift into “J” for Jesus-life. If I’m not there, there’s something more for me to do.” This would be so much more helpful if he would point out examples of people recommending “doing nothing to avoid doing something in the flesh” rather than setting up a straw man and pushing it over. He mentions but does not cite Andrew Murray.
  4. Bill at Defending Contending blames sin generally and divorce in particular for the current state of the American economy. “Capitalism must break down; it’s not designed for a completely unrighteous people. As America slips into paganism, our economy will become the economy of a pagan nation.”
  5. James White on offending atheists; Daniel at Puritan Reformed amens. I haven’t seen or heard this sixteen-minute clip yet, but the “it’s time to stop being polite” argument sounds familiar to anyone who has listened to Richard Dawkins recently.
  6. Daniel at Puritan Reformed offers a link to Brannon Howse interviewing Matt Smith; Mosab Hassan Yousef, son of Hamas leader Sheikh Hassan Yousef, attends Smith’s church. “Until and unless the people of the Middle East embrace Christ and surrender their hatred and their hearts to Him, there will be no peace in the region.”
  7. Chris Lyons talks about the end of the global warming debate. Like Lyons we typically avoid the Huffington Post here, too. No quote necessary, really.
  8. John Baker links to a Guardian (UK) article about the Richard Dawkins/New Atheist bus campaign. And with that color scheme I suspect Dunkin Donuts is involved somehow.
  9. Bill Wilson talks about Islam in America, touches on the protests in Ft Lauderdale on December 30th. I think I also linked to this article dealing with those protests a few days ago. “Throughout the Bible it is shown that nations perish when they allow false religion to gain a foothold.” Yeah, that article on Dominionism is starting to feel overdue.
  10. Speaking of which, Scott Isebrand at Religious Right Watch (not an ODM) tries “gays and lesbians are the new Jews” as a sound bite. “Fundamentalists the world over spread myths about gay people, sexual and reproductive health, and science, they do so hoping to leverage the fear they create into power and access for fundamentalist leaders and cultural influence for fundamentalism as a movement.” For the record, we here at ODT agree that some conservative Christians got way too cozy with Adolph Hitler and his ideas before and during World War II (but of course see also Dietrich Bonhoeffer). Are Christians (apart from maybe Fred Phelps?) recommending killing homosexuals?
  11. James Swan spotlights Catholic apologist Tim Staples’s interpretation of Romans 5:12 (mp3 at link).
  12. Paul Walker says the Southern Baptist Convention’s (offline?) Missions Mosaic magazine is recommending lectio divina and labrynth-walking. I can’t find original sources for any of this online.
  13. Henry Neufeld starts off talking about Rick Warren’s “try it for sixty days” quote, ends up telling Christians generally to “get over it.” “What can we Christians be thinking? We expect Christianity to be easy (try it for 60 days). We expect to be prosperous, and for some reason, certainly not derived from experience, tradition, scripture, or even from any reasonable thought process, we think we shouldn’t be attacked, criticized, or ridiculed.”
  14. David Reagan ponders the question of whether the Antichrist will be a Muslim. “I recently read four books that relate to this topic. One lays the biblical foundation without asserting that the Antichrist will actually be a Muslim. The other three use that foundation to make the assertion. Each of these books will be reviewed over the next couple of entries.”
  15. Denise at Surph’s Side links to Clifton Loucks, who dissects and rejects the Apostles’ Creed. “What do unbelievers think as they attend our assemblies and hear us say, “He [Jesus Christ] descended into Hell” after his death, and then try to explain away the obvious meaning of the words by saying that Christ really didn’t go to Hell? Why should they believe anything else they hear in our assemblies?”
  16. Chris Rosebrough: Book of Mormon “best used as toilet paper.” (~28:00).

OD Today: 4 January 2009 (late edition)

January 4, 2009

I have a lot to do this afternoon, so I’m catching up and calling the day early. Tomorrow work starts in earnest again after the holiday, so I’m going to have to tighten the criteria I use for linking here. I will probably end up dropping articles that just link or quote another item without comment.

  1. Cindy Kunsman gives an overview of authoritarian teachings within Christianity, particularly Bill Gothard and what Kunsman calls “submission doctrine.” “Bill Gothard openly promotes this teaching as the ‘umbrella of protection’ teaching, and many of the groups that originated during this same era espouse some similar version of this ‘umbrella’ exemplar which they communicated to their spiritual posterity.”
  2. Ingrid Schlueter continues her comments on modesty with a link to an article by Timothy Paul Jones. “When I see a young girl displaying her sexual charms to the world at large, my first thought is, where is her father? Why is he endangering his daughter by allowing her to dress this way?”
  3. Jeremy at Renewing Our Minds discusses some of the ways in which Mormonism deviates from Christianity, then calls out denominations as being cults writ small. “It appears that a denomination is a liberal cult.”
  4. Jason Garwood shares Arthur Pink‘s “Present Day Evangelism.” I think this is the third time this particular article has surfaces in the last couple of weeks.
  5. Michael Newnham talks about Sabbath-keeping, then announces he’s taking the day off. Good for you, Michael.
  6. Miriam Franklin comments on Charlie Robinson and his “Third Heaven” experience.
  7. Christine at Talk Wisdom discusses coverage of the ongoing conflict between Israel and Hamas, calls out Larry King/CNN.
  8. Bill Salus on Israel/Hamas.
  9. Stan Goodenough on Israel/Hamas.
  10. Joel Rosenberg on Israel/Hamas.
  11. Richard Land on Israel/Hamas (1, 2). Land appears to be tilting in favor of a two-state solution.
  12. Miriam Franklin opens a discussion on whether the apostolic authority to heal the sick, raise the dead, and drive out demons is applicable today.
  13. Job at Jesus Christology delves into the implications of postmodernism in understanding the attributes of God. “So for some issues, modernism, postmodernism, and premodernism are inadequate. Modernism can only deal with truths that can be observed or measured according to some rational system so that mind makes right. Postmodernism makes truth a moving target so that it can be the instrument of whoever is best able to use – or misuse – it so that feelings make right. And premodernism allows truth to be defined by human institutions and authority so that might makes right. So when it comes to the Bible, all of them come short.”
  14. Emily H. at Grace in the Triad visits an abortion clinic. “I don’t just want to tell them they are wrong to abort their babies, although that is true. I want to hug them and cry with them and show them how my heart breaks for them. I wish we had the chance to pray with them and figure out an alternate plan. I wish that just one of them had listened.”
  15. Miriam Franklin picks up Tony Blair‘s comments on religion generally and Islam in particular.
  16. Cia W. at EFT & Spiritual Warfare encounters an NIV/The Message combination Bible, gives it a thumbs down, links/quotes this article from Berean Call (Dave Hunt/T. A. McMahon).

And finally, something completely different: at Secular Right, Heather McDonald comments on Christopher Hitchen’s comments on Rick Warren’s invitation to give the invocation at Barack Obama’s inauguration: “How, then, do they live with the knowledge that their friends and loved ones face an eternity of torment? … Either believers live with an extraordinary degree of cognitive dissonance between the inclusive values of their society and the dictates of their religion, or they unconsciously mitigate those bloody-minded dictates as atavistic vestiges from a more primitive time.”

My apologies to anyone who thought this might finally be an update without a reference to Rick Warren.

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OD Today: 3 January 2009 (late edition)

January 3, 2009

Some backing and filling, some stray links.

  1. Bruce Prescott, liberal Baptist, on Southern Baptist families and divorce. “SBC leaders leaders still think the solution to the problem of divorce is to tell wives to “submit” to their husbands. “Submissive” wives don’t question their husband’s directions and they hold their tongues when they know their husband is leading the family astray.”
  2. A transcript of Paris Reidhead‘s sermon Ten Shekels and A Shirt.
  3. Orrin Judd links to a Jerusalem Post article on the current conflict between Israel and Hamas, thanking George W. Bush for his support.
  4. Orrin Judd excerpts a couple of articles, one suggesting that reason is insufficient as a basis of government, the other on results from a recent Harris poll regarding American attitudes toward abortion.
  5. Henry Neufield on the case of Keith John Sampson, a student and janitor at IUPUI found guilty of racial harassment for reading Todd Tucker’s book Notre Dame vs. The Klan (see als0).
  6. Michael Davis on Muslim unrest in Rosengård, Sweden. “The problem is that those in the West fail to understand that Islam is far from being just another religion–it is at its core a way of life. A way of life which is in many ways at odds with much of the free societies that it is transplanted in.”
  7. David Hocking relays talking points regarding Israel and Hamas from Shimon Erem of Israel Christian Nexus. “The Consulate General of Israel has asked me to convey some basic points to help you better understand the facts of the current military operation in Gaza. We hope they will assist you in communications with your congregation and others with whom you are in contact.”
  8. Christine at Talk Wisdom links to Mike Rucker’s comments on Israel/Hamas, offers her own comments. “I have often believed that Israel needs a strong leader again. They need a man like Benjamin Netanyahu.”
  9. Howard Fisher on Muslim perspectives on Jesus. “To be honest, I have to wonder if the Muslim mind is able to grasp that Jesus had a purpose which required far more cunning and wisdom than man would ever conceive.”
  10. Chris Rosebrough shares video clips from Patricia King and Joshua Mills regarding “transports in the Spirit,” in this case to China; she also plugs something called the Extreme Plunge Volunteer Program.
  11. John Sexton plugs a Fox News program on Mosab Hassan Yousef.
  12. Kit passes on links to claims that Keith Green was murdered by Catholics.
  13. Ingrid Schlueter, this time at her personal weblog, discusses outrages regarding sexuality and femininity in America. “I recently watched a program on EWTN, the Catholic TV channel. While I disagree on some things, their teachings on family and God’s plan for motherhood is beautiful and helpful, and is utterly absent in freak show evangelical television.

We’d like to wish Ingrid Schlueter and her baby good health.

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