Posts Tagged ‘Phil Perkins’

OD Weekend: 24-25 January 2009

January 25, 2009

There were lots and lots of postings in the ODM community this weekend, but I took the weekend off from following them (well, until now). I will be on an open-ended business trip starting Thursday evening, so updates may be few and far between soon.

  1. Jonathan Falwell offers an open letter to President Obama. “Why do Christians continue to dwell on abortion? Consider this: Since 1971, more than 49 million babies have been aborted in our nation. According to National Right to Life, about 1.2 million abortions were performed in our nation in 2006. While this figure is down from previous years, the abortion holocaust remains our national shame. Dr. Alveda King, pastoral associate of Priests for Life and niece of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., noted this week, “… there is no greater injustice than that suffered by the 4,000 babies, 1,400 of them black, who die on any given day at the hands of abortionists.””
  2. Richard Land hosts Henry Blackaby, who is pushing a book on spiritual gifts and the Holy Spirit. “Henry says of his book, “This book is not an exhaustive study on the Holy Spirit, but it will reorient your thinking to biblical teaching on the Spirit’s role in your life, clarify the apparent confusion between natural talents and spiritual gifts, and help you get in step with God’s purpose…””
  3. Carol at Abomination Nation takes on Feng Shui and Indigo Children. “The Bible clearly condemns Feng Shui, and all other forms of occult witchcraft. Witchcraft is seeking spiritual guidance, power, or information from sources apart from God. There are only 2 sources of spiritual power: God and Satan.”
  4. Jennifer O’Hara connects the dots among Islam, socialism, and sadism. ” There are quite a few people out there who think that President Obama and his staff want another great depression, because it opens the door for them to further dominate, control, and steal liberty away from the American people. As much as I hate to believe it, part of me looks around, listens to what they have to say, and can’t help but accept it as truth.”
  5. Ken Silva continues to take on the Emergent Church, refers to Red Letter Christians as “post-liberal.”
  6. Phil Perkins offers a special article on Henry Blackaby. “The problem isn’t Blackaby. Anybody could be Blackaby and anyone could have written a book that promoted feelings as the primary way of coming to an intimate knowledge of God. The condition that made it possible for this man to make millions of dollars hoodwinking the church is the MENTAL GHETTO conditions in the pew.”
  7. Desert Pastor/Defending Contending take on Charles G. Finney, link to an old article by Phillip Johnson. “Predictably, most of Finney’s spiritual heirs lapsed into apostasy, Socinianism, mere moralism, cultlike perfectionism, and other related errors. In short, Finney’s chief legacy was confusion and doctrinal compromise. Evangelical Christianity virtually disappeared from western New York in Finney’s own lifetime. Despite Finney’s accounts of glorious “revivals,” most of the vast region of New England where he held his revival campaigns fell into a permanent spiritual coldness during Finney’s lifetime and more than a hundred years later still has not emerged from that malaise.” It is probably worth noting that opinions differ on the meaning of the term “burned-over district:” I repeatedly see both the contention (as in this article) that it referred to nobody in western New York having any interest in Christianity and also the view that everyone had been converted. I have not read Whitney Cross, originator of the term, and so can’t say which is correct.
  8. Steve Hays offers opinion on President Obama, good diversity, and bad diversity. “For example, San Francisco would be far better off with more Christian Chinese-Americans and fewer white liberals.”
  9. Cindy Kunsman takes on postmodernism and the public perception of Christianity vs. “totalitarian niceness.” “My husband describes this strange, postmodern twist on the golden rule (“Do unto others as you would have them do unto you”) as a nearly impossible task: “Do unto others as those others would have you do unto them.””
  10. Kris at SGM Survivors parses the idea of “believing the best” about someone, especially during disagreement, conflict, and mistrust. “Moreover, it’s downright ludicrous to me that anyone would assume that someone purported to have behaved badly years ago and then successfully swept this situation under the rug for a decade would suddenly be willing to be completely open and honest about it with some random questioner ten years later. … Do your leaders extend this grace to YOU? … Yet…if a PASTOR is spoken of negatively, the member is supposed to automatically “believe the best”? Where’s the logic in any of this?  How can this be supported from Scripture?” I’m not going to try to place this on the spectrum of correct and incorrect interpretations of “be subject unto the higher powers.”
  11. Miriam Franklin addresses the new accusations against Ted Haggard. “Why are we only hearing details about this NOW?”
  12. Ralph Petersen offers a contrary view on the end of racism in the Obama administration. “it is evident that this president, even on inauguration day and amid all his .. blather about “coming together,” and “unity,” cannot let racism die.”
  13. Defending Contending asks where Rick Warren goes from here, suggests the answer is “left.”
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OD Today: 23 January 2009 (early edition)

January 23, 2009

Yesterday’s late update was very late, so there isn’t a lot new overnight. Mostly a continuation of ongoing stories, with a couple of surprises, including a reference to Henry Blackaby.

  1. Mike Ratliff continues his series looking forward to cultural changes under the Obama administration and their implications for conservative Christians. “I am convinced that how we deal with the Obama administration during this time is a huge part of our sanctification. We must balance out what we are commanded to do in that we must be good citizens, but we must also be obedient to God in all things. Therefore, when our government attempts to enforce unrighteousness upon us we have no choice except to take a stand in obedience to God.”
  2. Kit offers the collection of Rick Warren connections collected by Sandy Simpson. The original is here, and appears to be five years old. I wonder what Rick Warren’s been up to since then?
  3. Darryl Foster calls out Frederick Haynes for speaking at the National Black Justice Coalition’s Black Church Summit. “The Haynes engagement signals the gay church movement’s continued quest to incorporate mainstream false teachers into its mission. False teachers love false christian movements.”
  4. Dwayna Litz reflects on homosexuals and transgenders in the New York area. “I only saw him as a person in need of Jesus. Contrary to what the homosexuals believe, not all Christians hate them.”
  5. Phil Perkins continues his series on the intellectual shortcomings of American evangelicalism with an article on subjectivism, calls Henry Blackaby a heretic. “Churches, schools, and denominations who would never have been guilty of teaching the subjectivism of Barth or Schleiermacher embraced the Evangelical language and style of Blackaby. He was a Southern Baptist preacher, so most couldn’t imagine that he was liberal. But he was heretical.”
  6. Steve Camp parses Rick Warren’s inaugural prayer. “Did he invoke the name of Jesus as he promised? Barely; and with all the conviction that playing politics with God could muster, Mr. Purpose Driven watered-down his prayer …”
  7. Colin Smith offers a side-by-side comparison between particular surahs from the Koran and corresponding passages from the Old Testament. “the Qur’an draws particularly from stories concerning Old Testament prophets to illustrate Muhammad’s warnings, and teach regarding obedience and faithfulness to Allah and his commands. There are two things particularly noteworthy about the Qur’anic use of the Old Testament: first, the stories are always presented as teaching tools to make a present-day (at least for Muhammad) point; second, they are rarely, if ever, presented without embellishment–sometimes to the point where the original Old Testament story is barely discernible.”
  8. Emily H. at Grace in the Triad takes on Shane Claiborne and the New Monastics. “The only problem with the New Monasticism movement is its foundation–and therefore everything built upon the foundation. There is no clear theological basis for New Monasticism; they accept anything & everything that is nominally Christian, promoting what Pastor Dustin describes as a “buffet bar” mentality to Christianity.”
  9. And finally, Mollie Hemingway reports on reporting on the March for Life. “In some cases — notably the Washington Post in the last couple of years — coverage of pro-life events has improved. In other cases, not so much. Each year pro-life march participants joke — a lot — about how their numbers are laughably under-counted. They’ll know, say, that they themselves came in a caravan of 5,000 people in rented buses from Pittsburgh but they’ll read the paper the next day describe the entire crowd as consisting of “thousands.””
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OD Today: 19 January 2009 (early edition)

January 19, 2009

Many many links and we try to catch up from a week off. The anti-Obama crowd is stepping up rhetoric ahead of tomorrow’s inauguration (see also the Gene Robinson stories), and accusations against Sovereign Grace Ministries are not going away. Other than that? Emergents and Nazis, but not in the same story.

  1. Religious Right Watch alerts on Blogs for Life, also notes an article about Rick Warren at The Nation accusing him of tax fraud. “The facts were simple: in 1993 Warren deducted $77,663, his entire Saddleback Church salary that year, as a housing expense–and paid no taxes at all on that salary.”
  2. Chris Rosebrough connects the Emerging Church to John Shelby Spong. Rosebrough spent most of last week and a couple of days before that on this topic, both at his weblog and on his podcast. I will put together a summary if I have time. “The Emergents claim that they are a ‘third way’ or a synthesis and middle ground between liberalism and conservatism. Yet, they are coming to the same conclusions as “modern” liberals. The Emergent movement is nothing more than a Post-Modern form of Liberalism.”
  3. Chris Rosebrough calls out Rick Warren for making a passing reference to Hitler Youth (and devotees of Mao Zedong) as an example of dedication to a cause. I can’t agree with Rosebrough’s parsing of Jesus’s message (I don’t see the dichotomy between meeting felt needs and making disciples that Rosebrough sees), and I don’t agree with Rosebrough’s parsing of what Warren says, but I have to agree that modern Christians need to get as far away from Nazi narratives and imagery as possible. Not only that, but it reminds me of repeated references to exactly the same language used by e.g. Doug Coe (of The Family) fame, as cited by Jeff Sharlet in his book The Family. Note that Warren does not actually praise the Nazis (YouTube). “Lifting up Nazi passion and commitment and asking Christians to have that same passion and commitment is not just tacky, it is out right creepy. Is Warren building an army?”
  4. Robin Brace takes on the question of whether Christians need to observe the Sabbath. “The common Seventh Day Adventist error is in failing to notice the difference between the original institution of something and the point at which a particular divine prescription comes into effect.”
  5. Thomas Heringer interpolates some comments from Barack Obama, returns to the common theme that Obama is preparing the United States for a place in a global government. “If what is meant in the bold type, that Obama means for those of us who still believe the Bible should give it up to a global ideal, then I have a problem with it.” There are really two strands here that are fairly common among conservative Christians with an ODM bent: Christianity as a religion among other religions, and global government. These are related ideas but they’re not really the same.
  6. Russell Moore hates Sanctity of Life Sunday. “I hate Sanctity of Human Life Sunday because I’m reminded that we have to say things to one another that human beings shouldn’t have to say. Mothers shouldn’t kill their children. Fathers shouldn’t abandon their babies. No human life is worthless, regardless of skin color, age, disability, economic status. The very fact that these things must be proclaimed is a reminder of the horrors of this present darkness. … I’m reminded that there are children, maybe even blocks from my pulpit, who’ll be slapped, punched, and burned with cigarettes before nightfall. I’m reminded that there are elderly men and women languishing away in loneliness, their lives pronounced to be a waste.”
  7. Kris at Sovereign Grace Ministries Survivors picks up the question of whether SGM pastors bug their offices and meeting rooms. “And then someone sent me a snippet of an email that had been received from someone … who reported positively ”knowing” that some of the things shared here on this site were inaccurate, because he’d had access to the “transcripts of conversations” between the SGM member and his/her SGM pastors, and the SGM member sharing his/her story on this blog had relayed false information, based upon a comparison with the “transcript” to which this SGM staff person had access.”
  8. Christine at Talk Wisdom picks up the “Obama is a one-worlder” theme again.
  9. Miriam Franklin offers a recap post on Chuck Pierce and his complete line of Christian charm bracelets, complete with pictures. “It ain’t just the merchandising and false prophecy that is wrong in this case. This is pretty blatant stuff – are “Christians” really so naive as to be taken in by it? And are they really so superstitious?  I guess so, as Chuck’s ministry has brought out more than one range of this type of jewellery.”
  10. Phil Perkins announces a series in which he will be taking on Frank Turk regarding usage of gender in Bible translations.
  11. Miriam Franklin parses an upcoming New Ecstatics meeting including John Crowder. “John Crowder is also known to dress sometimes in brown monk’s habits, use the Latin Vulgate, quote Catholic mystics and heretics, and use Gregorian monk chants as background music to his videos. As well as to heavily promote ecumenicism.”
  12. Timmy Brister parses Gene Robinson’s theology. “nothing is said of the nature of this god, and nothing is asked in reference of him doing what only a god could do.  The prayer is fundamentally ethical, not theological.”
  13. Mollie Ziegler Hemingway offers an omnibus post on press coverage of tomorrow’s inauguration. Have I said lately how much I love MZH? Catch her also, occasionally, on Issues, etc.
  14. Rick Frueh warns against interpreting contemporary events in the light of eschatology. “Let me say that any nation has the right and responsibility to protect its citizens, however that is not the concern of the church neither is it our message.”
  15. Ingrid Schlueter comments on Gene Robinson. “Fox Religion Correspondent, Lauren Green, has a column on sodomite rebel, Rev. Gene Robinson, who is scheduled to pray at an Inaugural prayer event. Robinson, who lives with his gay lover, is just “horrified” over aggressively Christian prayers. Yeah, Gene, well, some of us are “horrified” at what passes for Christian clergy these days.”
  16. Sharon Lindbloom parses a recent sermon by Thomas Monson. “Amazingly, Thomas Monson took the clear and powerful Word of God — a revelation wherein God declared His divine initiative in blessing His people — and misapplied it to teach his followers that God’s blessings are bestowed according to human attainment.”
  17. Ingrid Schlueter takes up the story of Edward Purvis, who defrauded Christian investors in Arizona and twelve other states by promising them big bucks for funding a ministry. “It takes two sides to make a fraudulent financial scheme work—a criminal or criminals on the one side and greedy, simple-minded people on the other.” I for one applaud Schlueter’s focus on profiteering in Christianity, and look forward to her bringing up the topic the next time she welcomes an author who visits Crosstalk to push a book.
  18. Stephen Shields at Next Wave gives a history of the Emerging/Emergent Church, with quotes from all the usual suspects. Thanks to Jonathan Dodson.
  19. Ingrid Schlueter pulls an Obama two-fer: following Concerned Women for America in calling Barack Obama the most virulent pro-abortion President, and joining Joseph Farah in praying Obama fails. “Joseph Farah, I, and millions of other believers are praying for the failure of Barack Obama in his attempts to widen access to child-killing in abortion clinics, grant full legitimacy to homosexual relationships through civil unions, and establish a socialist economic system in this country.”
  20. Michael Newnham calls out C. J. Mahaney and Sovereign Grace Ministries, particularly for suggesting that he/they are apostles. “we can assume that the “apostles” are going to stonewall the situation unless forced by bad publicity to do otherwise. Side note here…when your church is run by men who call themselves “apostles”…run.”

OD Today: 9 January 2009 (late edition)

January 9, 2009

Today we’ve got a bumper crop of links. Marcus Borg appears out of nowhere and everybody’s interested in him. Go figure.

  1. Daniel Pulliam discusses a Tribune article on Trinity United Church of Christ now that the Obamas have left. “I knew we would come out better and stronger for enduring the attack. Now we can accomplish what Rev. Wright wants. We can accomplish what Rev. Moss wants. We can accomplish what God wants.”
  2. Stuff Christians Like post 469, about being pastor or staff: “Can you keep complex counts in multiples of 2s, 3s, and 4s but can’t remember how many times in a row you’ve sung a song?” (Then you might be a worship leader.)
  3. Yomi at Theology Today calls out false prophets. “Now think clearly about it: every Chris, Enoch, Matthew, and David are claiming to be anointed ones all over the place. Such a claim was not made by even those specially chosen by Jesus to lay the foundation of the Church. None of the apostles claimed to be “anointed ones”, though they had more right to the claim than anyone else!” (I had originally accused Yomi of not naming names here; these are apparently the first names of prominent people in Nigeria. Please see the comments.)
  4. David Reagan offers part four of his series on whether the Antichrist is Muslim. “Another misleading aspect of Richardson’s presentation is his constant talk about the “amazing parallels” and “startling similarities” between Islamic and biblical end time prophecies. Actually, there is nothing startling or amazing when you consider the fact that Mohammed borrowed nearly all his key ideas from Bible stories he heard from both Jews and Christians, stories he often got thoroughly confused.”
  5. Religion News Blog is still on the Jett Travolta/Scientology story. Why don’t any ODMs pick this up?
  6. Underdog Theology shares an illustration from John MacArthur, taken from a story by Anton Chekov. Why must The Truth be illustrated by fiction?
  7. Herescope sees planned African food voucher programs as creeping Communitarianism and an attempt to undermine local churches in Africa.
  8. Kris at Sovereign Grace Ministries Survivors says Sovereign Grace Ministries have called in a third party (Ken Sande’s Peacemakers) to arrange reconciliation with the Noel/Grizzly situation. Kris asks a bunch of rhetorical questions I won’t repeat here. “Don’t get me wrong. I’m glad that SGM finally got around to taking an action – involving Sande and his organization – that apparently acknowledges that they may not have handled Noel’s situation appropriately. But so many questions remain.”
  9. Jeremy Nelson jumps on the Billy Graham clip Ken Silva commented on earlier in the day, says “Not a surprise from a Freemason.”
  10. Jonathan Dodson picks up the New Atheist British ad campaign.
  11. John Chishem offers the latest installment of his review of Jesus Wants To Save Christians. Unlike most ODMs he allows comments on his site, and he’s drawn some attention from Emergent types.
  12. Chris Lyons offers random thoughts on Israel. “Thus, when someone says “can you give me the short answer”, my answer is “I don’t think there is one”…”
  13. Darryl Foster opens for comments on megachurches in general. “I dont think the “megachurch” model currently reigning as the desired after church standard is biblical. I think after a while it will run its course and become a religious dinosaur. I think all those who have built their careers on megachurch mentality will be in a spiritual soupline. What do you think?”
  14. Chris Rosebrough shares a clip featuring Marcus Borg (YouTube).
  15. Scott McClare collects links, including Albert Mohler on the atheist ad campaign.
  16. Terry Mattingly (not an ODM) on the treatment of facts and opinions, particularly editorial shortcomings when hard facts are abundant. This sort of speaks to what I’m trying to get at in item 6 above.
  17. Dave Marriott begins a review of a book by Marcus Borg. “Borg holds that Jesus is the decisive revelation of God (even “more decisive than the Bible”), but yet he admits that a human body cannot display omnipotence or omniscience, characteristics he knows to be true concerning God. Where did he get this conception of God if not from the Jesus?”
  18. Phil Perkins issues apologies and corrections. “some have asked if I believe that anything but a word-for-word translation is a sin or incorrect. No, I don’t. In fact, some of my readers are multi-lingual, so I know that they know there is not such thing as a word-for-word translation unless the document is very short. No two languages have vocabulary with a one-to-one correlation and no two languages have identical grammar and syntax. Literal, word-for-word translation is preferred, but never possible in all situations.”
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OD Today: 8 January 2009 (late edition)

January 8, 2009

Really nothing but continuing stories in this update; Desert Pastor (see item 14) summarizes the views of most everything I’ve heard or read from conservative Christians regarding the current conflict in and around Gaza.

  1. Chris Rosebrough says Barack Obama “is a Christian” even if he is heterodox (podcast, at about 23:00).
  2. The Frog in the Kettle says God is not blessing America. “God stopped blessing us many many years ago.  Perhaps He’s restraining His judgement upon us or we’re benefiting from His mercy, but c’mon, do we really think He’s blessing us? … take it for what its worth, just a gimmick used by career politicians to trick you into thinking they’re on your side, they’re like you.”
  3. Ingrid Schlueter calls out cowboy churches. “A cutting-edge idea would be to have a dual-theme church where men and boys go off to the pirate service and women and girls go to a Disney princess service. There could even be some dramatic interplay between the two where pirates kidnap a damsel and Prince Charming rides into the service on his white horse to rescue the maiden. The sermon potential here is rich.” She also manages to tie in Rick Warren and says “If people have a problem with long sermons and being taught about sin and hell, their greatest need is not accommodation—it is repentance. Sadly, few will hear that message in these circus-driven churches.”
  4. Justin Taylor lists life highlights for Richard John Neuhaus (1936-2009), including Evangelicals and Catholics Together (1994).
  5. Dwayna Litz on women teaching men. “See Acts 18:26—Priscilla taught a man!”
  6. David Reagan presents part three of his series on the question of whether the Antichrist is a Muslim. “Next, he claims that since Antiochus Epiphanes — a type of the Antichrist — came from the Seleucid or Assyrian area of the Grecian Empire (Syria and Iraq), the Antichrist must also come from that area.”
  7. Christine at Talk Wisdom says Barack Obama will turn America’s back on Israel. “I think that Israel already knows that her security will mostly fall upon Her own shoulders once Obama is in office. The steadfast loyalty, security, unconditional stance and friendship of the United States government (of the past) with Israel might (tragically) be severely at risk.”
  8. Ingrid Schlueter endorses home schooling, Abeka, and Bob Jones Press. “As a homeschooling parent for a number of years, I can tell you that it is possible to have top-drawer Christian education in your own home. … The peer segregation in churches and schools today breeds rebellion and disregard for adults and authority. … The biblical model is for the older to teach the younger.”
  9. Phil Perkins concludes his series on Online Discernment Ministries; he offers advice on how to fix ODMs and calls out Frank Turk. “Of HUGE CONCERN to most ODMers is the loss of formerly “Christian” institutions, like denominations, colleges, and seminaries. Did you know that God isn’t concerned about it?  He isn’t.”
  10. Ingrid Schlueter extolls the virtues of being old-fashioned. “Those of us who still have appreciation for the old ways that worked will have to band together. There aren’t very many of us!”
  11. Dave Hunt warns regarding the National Council of Churches‘ year-old warning regarding Christian Zionism. Does anyone call himself a Christian Zionist? Or is it always pejorative? “In fact, according to the NCC, Christian Zionist support for Israel is the main stumbling block to tranquility in the Middle East.”
  12. Ken Silva proclaims a split in Evangelicalism. “The time has come in the American Christian Church for division; for a reformation every bit the same as when Luther stood hammer in hand. Since my time is looking as if it’s nearing an end I’ll simply say that someone must arise and declare that there is no way to harmonize what you will hear in the following sermon from Dr. John MacArthur with the egregiously ecumenical postliberal cult of the Emerging Church and postevangelicalism, which is right now completely swallowing up centered on the self semi-pelagian evangelicalism.”
  13. Ingrid Schlueter advertises a Crosstalk interview with Albert Mohler. “I believe that legalized child-killing and homosexuality issue are the defining moral issues facing the church today. The impotent response of God’s people to these abominations are resulting in God’s judgment on our land.” Mohler will be pushing a book.
  14. And finally: Gaza updates and analysis from Desert Pastor and Joel Rosenberg.

OD Today: 6 January 2009 (early edition)

January 6, 2009

I’m picking up some stragglers from after the cutoff on the 5th, so I apologize if any of these are stale already. As it stands this looks like a pretty slow news day on the ODM front. The highlights are probably John Chishem (#5), Gary Gilley (#9) and Phil Perkins (#10).

  1. Carl Trueman on culture, generally. “Talk of `Christians can watch anything as long as they do it critically’ is as daft, unbiblical, soft-headed, ill-thought-out, and confused as anything one is likely to come across.”
  2. Jennifer O’Hara addresses the same issues, more or less, via a meander through pop music and is er, cousin, Contemporary Christian Music (some rated-PG language). “This dearth of real wealth, combined with the loss of wonder and an eschewing of widely accepted standards, is now making itself heard not only in pop music, but in other forms of entertainment, with waves of vapid and dystopian books, plays, films, and television filling our theatres and bookshops, crowding out what used to be referred to as “the good stuff” in the process; after all, those things are old-fashioned, restrictive, and unenlightened.”
  3. Jonathan Dodson presents part two of a review of ReJesus, by Michael Frost and Alan Hirsch. I’m including it because it mentions a concept I haven’t seen recently: “How then do we become like Jesus?”
  4. John Baker shares an anti-Rick Warren video (YouTube). This is the same video that appeared on Four Pointer a few hours ago.
  5. John Chisham begins his review of Rob Bell‘s book Jesus Wants To Save Christians. Not to be confused with a similarly-titled post on a similarly-named weblog regarding the same book a week ago. “I was suckered in to purchase this book by the crowd which states that I have no right to discuss ideas found in the book without having first read it. I always say to them that I do not have to go into a chicken barn to know that it stinks…”
  6. Miriam Franklin picks up the Harriet Bernstein/Luisa Paster/Ocean Grove Camp Meeting Association story. Additional procedural details regarding the history of the case, from the State of New Jersey are here.
  7. Lane Chapin revisits a year-old post dealing with the question of whether doctrine divides. “It’s the “cry of anguish” from the culture. They insist that we shouldn’t preach doctrine, just love, but is this possible?” Does Chapin name his “they?” I couldn’t find any names or references.
  8. Defending Contending takes issue with Jay Bakker‘s choice of language (note: Jay’s church’s website contains language some may find offensive).
  9. Gary Gilley reviews Tim Keller‘s book The Reason For God (thanks Dwayna Litz). Gilley objects to Keller’s credal criteria for who is (and is not) a Christian; “Keller’s arguments are largely philosophical, not biblical … when he gets to the gospel invitation, without any direct support from Scripture he offers three steps: repentance, faith in Christ, and becoming part of the church … Keller infuses a social dimension into his gospel definition … he is a strong proponent of theistic evolution.”
  10. Phil Perkins calls out Frank Turk for “Googling himself.” “Here are some recent examples I’ve come across in the last few weeks: Tim Challies showed up at Surphside here to once again assure everyone that he didn’t say what he said. Yes, all our screens were lying. It’s a virus. Rick Warren apologist, Richard Abanes, showed up here to defend RW and so did Ken Silva to defend himself. And then there was another who had a shill show up at another site, but I will refrain from naming him. Finally, Frank Turk turned up on the comment thread of yesterday’s post here at Al Tosap.” It’s a fine line between defending what one believes and defending one’s self, etc.
  11. Christine at Talk Wisdom cheers some of the results of the Madoff fraud. “The second page reveals some unfortunate victims of this Ponzi Scheme. But, am I glad that the aforementioned ones got hit? YES!”
  12. Sovereign Grace Ministry Survivors discussion of molestation/coverup story passes nine hundred comments. Cindy Kunsman weighs in.
  13. I’m Speaking Truth picks up the You Will Suffer/Prepare To Die meme. “For every sound teacher and sheep thirsty for the Word, their are thousands of pretenders who are leading millions dutifully into the lake of fire.”
  14. John Baker quotes Michael Horton’s book Christless Christianity. “I am not arguing in this book that we have arrived at Christless Christianity but that we are well on our way. There need not be explicit abandonment of any key Christian teaching, just a series of subtle distortions and not-so-subtle distractions.”
  15. Phil Naessens gives equal time to preterist Samuel Frost. No word on whether he’s found a self-proclaimed hyper-preterist available to do the same.

Here’s your bonus question of the day: What comes next in this series: “CRN,” “CRN.Info,” “CRN.Info2?”

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OD Today: 4 January 2009 (early edition)

January 4, 2009

The links overnight were few in number, but some of them are fascinating (Henry Neufield on belivers in liberal churches), troubling (Job at Jesus Christology on Palestinians), and outright disturbing (Miriam Franklin on charismatic ties to Guatemalan death squads). Enjoy.

  1. Miriam Franklin links to this article from the Western Standard (Calgary, Alberta) regarding the return of Todd Bentley, with some speculation about how he’ll make money. “There’s a new revival flavour-of-the-month, which is being led by Steve Gray out of Kansas City, and yes, has it’s own international TV hook-up.”
  2. John Baker quotes a Bloomberg article on current U. S. manufacturing output. “Every component suggests that the weakness is going to carry over into 2009.”
  3. Chris Rosebrough links and comments on Next Level Church‘s upcoming sermon series “The Gospel According to The Beatles.” “Notice that the Fab 4 have been promoted to ‘sainthood’ despite the fact that they all openly and bluntly rejected Jesus Christ (especially John Lennon).”
  4. Defending Contending links to an anti-Seventh-Day-Adventist documentary (YouTube).
  5. Miriam Franklin has a long article on Harold Caballeros, associate of C. Peter Wagner and his association with death squads in his native Guatemala, excerpted in part from this document (PDF). This may be the most disturbing thing I’ve read today.
  6. John Baker quotes an article from the Arizona Republic about the Green Bible with comments from some of its critics. “The effort has received strong support from such prominent theologians as the Rev. Richard Cizik, former head of the National Association of Evangelicals, who has said that Christians had a Biblical mandate to take care of the Earth and that climate change was a crisis that needed to be addressed immediately.”
  7. Phil Perkins starts a series on Online Discernment Ministries. “When I saw that Team Pyro was shilling for Challies, I warned Phil Johnson, Frank Turk, and company of the sinful things Challies was doing. Instead of thanking me and checking it out to make sure I wasn’t lying, they immediately gave me the you’re-too-stupid-to-live treatment.”
  8. Cindy Kunsman offers a bunch of links on church abuse and recovery.
  9. John Kubicek links to a Joseph Farah editorial on Rick Warren’s “try Jesus for sixty days” comments.
  10. Job at Jesus Christology offers a long discussion of whether evangelical Christians, in their zeal for Israel, especially as part of its Dispensationalist picture of the future, consider the plight of rank and file Palestinians. “So the people suggesting that everything would be better if the Palestinians simply left en masse – or were Israel be bold and courageous enough to stand up for themselves by driving them out – either know full well that they are not proposing a workable solution or have not studied the situation enough to know that what they propose is not viable. Either way, they are no help to the situation, which means that they are no help to Israel or to the Jews. The truth is, though, that the people who believe that a solution for the Palestinians involves them remaining in Israel are not being much more realistic.”
  11. Henry Neufield offers links regarding claims by Casey Luskin, of the Discovery Institute, and responses from Ken Miller, Brown University biology professor.
  12. Henry Neufield offers a longish post on being a believer in a liberal church. “A friend of mine once commented to me that the main attack form of liberals is intellectual ridicule, while the main attack form of conservatives is moral condemnation. I’ve since had several conservative friends point out that many liberals are quite capable of moral condemnation, and I know the reverse to be true as well. Belief often does not stand up well to intellectual ridicule.”
  13. Henry Neufield offers a link to a televison ad by First United Methodist Church of Pensacola, Florida for their new program with “modern music” that “embraces the creative arts” (YouTube). I am guessing the latter term means there will be skits.
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