Posts Tagged ‘Ralph Petersen’

OD Today: 26 January 2009 (early edition)

January 26, 2009

A fair number of links today; a lot of them focused on abortion, Barack Obama, and related issues.

I’ve edited a quote in one item because it contained language some readers may find objectionable. The quote in situ is available at the associated link.

  1. Miriam Franklin offers an update with commentary on Patricia King and the Breaker Anointing. “Does Patricia King really so despise the existing New Covenant, and so despise and nullify the power and measure of the Holy Spirit who is given upon conversion to the child of God that she says He is not enough?”
  2. Paul Manata unloads on unnamed Reformed pastors who voted for Barack Obama. “Of course the two deserve each other. Rebels without a clue cheering a leader without a clue. Yeah, he speaks well. So did Hitler.”
  3. Ralph Petersen offers a second open letter to Barack Obama, this on about his “above my pay grade” answer at Saddleback. “And apparently, now you do know the answer to the question. By your recent executive order to reverse the abortion funds ban I guess you have decided that there really are some babies who are not worthy of human rights.”
  4. TurretinFan at Alpha & Omega (James White’s usual digs) offers part two in a promised series of thirteen articles responding to Jay Dyer, regarding Calvinism and the Nestorian error. “The existence of the hypostatic union is critical to the Calvinistic view of the atonement. The fact that the person of Christ was of infinite dignity on account of His divine nature makes the atonement of infinite intrinsic worth. The fact that the person of Christ had a truly human nature made the atoning death of Christ possible, as well as making the form of the sacrifice (death of man) a proper suffering of the penalty due. Without one or the other, the atonement would be impossible.”
  5. Miriam Franklin accuses C. Peter Wagner and New Apostolic Reformation of elitism and authoritarianism in the name of unity. “Unto dominionism with the apostles in power – this is NOT the gospel in any sense, nor the church’s mandate. It is dangerous power seeking dominionism in an antichrist antigospel.”
  6. Cindy Kunsman talks about postmodernism, history as a collection of emotional artifacts, and the implications of postmodernism within churches. “Her awakening did not strike me as remotely or notably different from her almost detatched description of other events and “artifacts” of her Obama campaign experience. That also came about through observing the emotions of someone else, perhaps another artifact for her, but it was an emotional artifact, so it demanded her attention.”
  7. Christine at Talk Wisdom blames mass hypnosis for Barack Obama’s popularity. “So, just why is it that Muslims don’t embrace Obama’s abortion holocaust? I will leave that question out there for the moment.”
  8. Terry Mattingly takes on the difficult question of church and state where health and particularly faith healing are concerned. “It appears that there is now a coalition — maybe — seeking to redraw the line, to make it easier to attack these kinds of radical believers.”
  9. Boyd Miller takes a shot at churches who afford their pastors special privileges. “The bible says not to muzzle the ox that treads out the corn, however it doesn’t say anything about putting an unmuzzled ox in charge of the corn crib!”
  10. Miriam Franklin takes on Thomas Weeks. “I also know his ‘church’ is in dire financial straits. But for all that, this video is still worth highlighting to show how far some have strayed from the faith, and how much a man can get away with at the pulpit without rebuke in “the house of God”. (And people think Mark Driscoll is bad?!)”
  11. Jason Engwer picks up on a point discussed on Unbelievable? regarding the Matthew resurrection of people other than Jesus. “Supposedly, the raising of the dead referred to in that passage is historically unlikely, since the other gospels don’t mention it and Josephus doesn’t mention it, for example.” Coincidentally, Brian Thornton picks up this exact passage of scripture here, but does not deal with the historicity question.
  12. Julio Severo comments on Barack Obama’s abortion policy in the context of his other policies. “The messiah has become Herod.”
  13. Aaron Shafovaloff offers episode three of Mormon Coffee TableTalk (audio). I can’t find the iTunes link for this podcast, and would appreciate any pointers.
  14. Tim Challies offers links a la carte, including the link to the much-linked (but un-commented-upon) John Piper abortion talking points.
  15. Michael Newnham offers an interview with David Di Sabatino on Larry Norman, Lonnie Frisbee, John Wimber, and of course Chuck Smith Sr. “This is the interesting thing about your site, Michael, and even some of the comments that you make. I go in to http://www.phoenixpreacher.com on occasion and read this tendency to anathematize anyone who has a different take on things. Mark Driscoll is not a Christian because he speaks openly about [edit]. Todd Bentley isn’t a Christian because he does what he does. On and on. You have your favorites and as long as everyone lines up with them, they are okay. If not… too bad, so sad, thanks for playing. Now depart, ye cursed… That’s a tough room.” Many many ODT Kudos to Michael for sharing this interview.
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OD Weekend: 24-25 January 2009

January 25, 2009

There were lots and lots of postings in the ODM community this weekend, but I took the weekend off from following them (well, until now). I will be on an open-ended business trip starting Thursday evening, so updates may be few and far between soon.

  1. Jonathan Falwell offers an open letter to President Obama. “Why do Christians continue to dwell on abortion? Consider this: Since 1971, more than 49 million babies have been aborted in our nation. According to National Right to Life, about 1.2 million abortions were performed in our nation in 2006. While this figure is down from previous years, the abortion holocaust remains our national shame. Dr. Alveda King, pastoral associate of Priests for Life and niece of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., noted this week, “… there is no greater injustice than that suffered by the 4,000 babies, 1,400 of them black, who die on any given day at the hands of abortionists.””
  2. Richard Land hosts Henry Blackaby, who is pushing a book on spiritual gifts and the Holy Spirit. “Henry says of his book, “This book is not an exhaustive study on the Holy Spirit, but it will reorient your thinking to biblical teaching on the Spirit’s role in your life, clarify the apparent confusion between natural talents and spiritual gifts, and help you get in step with God’s purpose…””
  3. Carol at Abomination Nation takes on Feng Shui and Indigo Children. “The Bible clearly condemns Feng Shui, and all other forms of occult witchcraft. Witchcraft is seeking spiritual guidance, power, or information from sources apart from God. There are only 2 sources of spiritual power: God and Satan.”
  4. Jennifer O’Hara connects the dots among Islam, socialism, and sadism. ” There are quite a few people out there who think that President Obama and his staff want another great depression, because it opens the door for them to further dominate, control, and steal liberty away from the American people. As much as I hate to believe it, part of me looks around, listens to what they have to say, and can’t help but accept it as truth.”
  5. Ken Silva continues to take on the Emergent Church, refers to Red Letter Christians as “post-liberal.”
  6. Phil Perkins offers a special article on Henry Blackaby. “The problem isn’t Blackaby. Anybody could be Blackaby and anyone could have written a book that promoted feelings as the primary way of coming to an intimate knowledge of God. The condition that made it possible for this man to make millions of dollars hoodwinking the church is the MENTAL GHETTO conditions in the pew.”
  7. Desert Pastor/Defending Contending take on Charles G. Finney, link to an old article by Phillip Johnson. “Predictably, most of Finney’s spiritual heirs lapsed into apostasy, Socinianism, mere moralism, cultlike perfectionism, and other related errors. In short, Finney’s chief legacy was confusion and doctrinal compromise. Evangelical Christianity virtually disappeared from western New York in Finney’s own lifetime. Despite Finney’s accounts of glorious “revivals,” most of the vast region of New England where he held his revival campaigns fell into a permanent spiritual coldness during Finney’s lifetime and more than a hundred years later still has not emerged from that malaise.” It is probably worth noting that opinions differ on the meaning of the term “burned-over district:” I repeatedly see both the contention (as in this article) that it referred to nobody in western New York having any interest in Christianity and also the view that everyone had been converted. I have not read Whitney Cross, originator of the term, and so can’t say which is correct.
  8. Steve Hays offers opinion on President Obama, good diversity, and bad diversity. “For example, San Francisco would be far better off with more Christian Chinese-Americans and fewer white liberals.”
  9. Cindy Kunsman takes on postmodernism and the public perception of Christianity vs. “totalitarian niceness.” “My husband describes this strange, postmodern twist on the golden rule (“Do unto others as you would have them do unto you”) as a nearly impossible task: “Do unto others as those others would have you do unto them.””
  10. Kris at SGM Survivors parses the idea of “believing the best” about someone, especially during disagreement, conflict, and mistrust. “Moreover, it’s downright ludicrous to me that anyone would assume that someone purported to have behaved badly years ago and then successfully swept this situation under the rug for a decade would suddenly be willing to be completely open and honest about it with some random questioner ten years later. … Do your leaders extend this grace to YOU? … Yet…if a PASTOR is spoken of negatively, the member is supposed to automatically “believe the best”? Where’s the logic in any of this?  How can this be supported from Scripture?” I’m not going to try to place this on the spectrum of correct and incorrect interpretations of “be subject unto the higher powers.”
  11. Miriam Franklin addresses the new accusations against Ted Haggard. “Why are we only hearing details about this NOW?”
  12. Ralph Petersen offers a contrary view on the end of racism in the Obama administration. “it is evident that this president, even on inauguration day and amid all his .. blather about “coming together,” and “unity,” cannot let racism die.”
  13. Defending Contending asks where Rick Warren goes from here, suggests the answer is “left.”
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OD Today: 22 January 2009 (late edition)

January 22, 2009

Lots of abortion-related links today because today is the anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the Supreme Court decision that made abortion a federal issue (and legal with restrictions in all fifty states).

  1. La Shawn Barber name-checks Blogs4Life.
  2. Russell Moore offers a sermon on why the unborn still matter.
  3. Joe Carter offers an open letter to fetal humans.
  4. Frank Turk links to a video where a young man argues that it’s better for babies to be aborted than to be born poor.
  5. Defending Contending offers a retrospective of its own posts devoted to abortion.
  6. Ingrid Schlueter offers comments and a picture of an aborted fetus.
  7. Ralph Petersen compares abortions to body counts from various wars.
  8. Bob Hayton offers a video devoted to a live baby.
  9. La Shawn Barber offers an opinion piece from 2003.
  10. John Ensor guests at Tim Challies, thinks about making abortion unthinkable.
  11. Justin Taylor offers two posts: one on abortion and the early Church, the other a collection of links. Some overlap with those above; sorry.

And just a couple of items unrelated to abortion:

I may have buried the lead. Sorry.

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OD Today: 20 January 2009 (early edition)

January 20, 2009

We’re expecting lots of inauguration-related links; we saw overnight more than we’re sharing now.

  1. Darryl Foster calls out the Church of God in Christ regarding elder Ronald Kimbrew and his relationship to an online gay clergy group. “Is COGIC going to be silent while an organized culture of homosexual ministers and bishops populate its pulpits?”
  2. Chris Rosebrough mentions Queermergent. Rosebrough is working on an “emergent church is postmodern liberal (as opposed to modern liberal)” theme going at his various outlets. “Even though Emergents try to navigate a middle road between liberalism and conservatism, then end up supporting the same agenda as their Modern Liberal cousins.”
  3. Henry Neufield reflects on the meaning of race within the Obama inauguration story. “As a Christian I believe we do owe one another allegiance, and that we do have a duty to help free the oppressed, to care for the poor and needy. I think there is a moral duty to do such things not because they are good for me, but because they are good. At the same time, I think God has so ordered the universe that it seems that I can do good for myself by doing good for others, that I will live in a richer and better society if I am willing to sacrifice for others and fight for their rights.”
  4. Jonathan Dodson ponders the pros and cons of churches partnering with non-profit groups. “So the question is not should we partner with non-profits, but when and where should we partner with them. Sometimes it will be best to not partner and other times it will be best.”
  5. John Baker copies Joseph Farah‘s call for Christians to pray that Barack Obama fails.
  6. Chris Rosebrough offers his take on Gene Robinson’s prayer. “This ‘god’ is an idol and a demon. This ‘god’ is powerless to answer and save and worshiping and following this demon ‘god’ will land people in hell.” (YouTube)
  7. Ralph Petersen offers comments of Ron Livesay, a recently-retired principal from a Christian school, suggests that evangelicals voted for Barack Obama because they went to public schools. “What caused the children of the so-called “religious right,” to change their moral imperatives so dramatically? In this article, Phyllis Schlafly suggests that most likely it’s the humanistic attitudes and decision-making they learned in the public schools, which 89 percent of U.S. students attend.” Warning: some readers may be offended by a drawing of an anatomically correct somewhat humaniform rhinoceros.
  8. Phil Johnson at Pyromaniacs on whether he’d pray at the Obama inauguration if given the chance: he’d decline “because Obama’s own stated intention is to make his inauguration “the most inclusive, open, accessible inauguration in American history,” and I would not want to affirm that goal, even tacitly.” This is part of a series, and it starts here.
  9. Ken Silva continues his series on Ravi Zacharias and Henri Nouwen. “In the first place, it needs to be understood here that as a Roman Catholic monk Nouwen not only rejected Sola Scriptura but also the genuine Gospel of Jesus Christ. Even so, RZIM recommends we read the Roman Catholic Nouwen and then make up our minds “as to Christian commitment.” But the question that needs to be asked here is: Why would supposedly Protestant evangelical RZIM even want to recommend that we read for our Christian edification writings from someone who denied Christ’s Gospel in the first place?” For the record I think this is a fair question, and I feel compelled to point out that Nouwen was a priest and not a monk.
  10. Miriam Franklin shares an anonymous story with a warning about laying on of hands/impartation. “A week or so after this “laying of hands” and “impartation,” I began to have this intense almost uncontrollable lust and desire for the senior pastor’s wife who I worked with.”
  11. Christine at Talk Wisdom is concerned by how chummy the outgoing President is with the incoming President.
  12. Terry Mattingly, at GetReligion, pushes a book about how the press doesn’t get religion, and also brushes up against the question of American civil religion and the “Orthodoxy of No Orthodoxy.” “The apparent orthodoxy of forbidding all orthodoxies is a philosophical puzzle in liberalism since John Locke. Journalists cannot be expected to solve it.”
  13. Jeremy at Renewing Our Minds posts a link to a sermon claiming that Billy Graham is going to hell. I haven’t seen it yet and can’t summarize.
  14. Mike Ratliff stakes out the most conservative position on abortion: “Rape, incest, and birth defects do not justify taking the life of a child.” Well, the second-most, I guess, since he doesn’t broach the question of the life of the mother.
  15. Job at Jesus Christology comes full circle in his exploration of Israel/Hamas: “Despite my sympathy for the Palestinians and many disagreements with Israeli policies, I have always maintained that ultimately Israel has not only the right but the responsibility to defend itself when faced with a population that throws rocks at Israeli tanks trying to avoid civilian casualties rather than at the terrorists using them as human shields.”
  16. Ingrid Schlueter copies a press release regarding the Freedom of Choice Act. It looks like it originates with American Right to Life. I believe this is the first time Schlueter has referred to Barack Obama as “America’s New Messiah.” The same press release is also here, and doesn’t include the term “New Messiah.”
  17. Chris Rosebrough delves deep into Barack Obama’s religious beliefs. I hope to get to this episode of Fighting for the Faith Today, but it’s a full two hours. Update: The Obama/Cathleen Falsani interview starts at about ninety minutes, and the article Rosebrough reads can be found here. I can’t do this justice; I’d encourage anyone and everyone to read the interview and listen to Rosebrough’s analysis. He says Obama “sounds like a postmodern/emergent” because he prefers the “subjective voice” to the “objective Word of God.” The payoff comes at about 1:52-55 or so; Rosebrough changes his call on Obama’s salvation, if I understand him correctly. Note also Obama’s specific reference to civic religion: “Alongside my own deep personal faith, I am a follower, as well, of our civic religion. I am a big believer in the separation of church and state. I am a big believer in our constitutional structure. I mean, I’m a law professor at the University of Chicago teaching constitutional law. I am a great admirer of our founding charter, and its resolve to prevent theocracies from forming, and its resolve to prevent disruptive strains of fundamentalism from taking root in this country.”
  18. I’m Speaking Truth picks up John Piper’s comments on Barack Obama’s aims for the American church. This is pretty heavy stuff, but I’m guessing most if not all of my readers have already seen the phrase “a minister of condemnation,” and I’m not going to try to unwind all this theology here. I think Piper’s argument is that by including Gene Robinson in the inauguration Obama is making the American church itself a minister of sin and damnation.
  19. Defending Contending also comments on the Obama inauguration. “People, your king is here; may God have mercy on us.”
  20. Mollie Hemingway at GetReligion offers an inauguration link-fest, and raises the spectre of Rick Warren praying “in Jesus’s name.” “We’ll be sure to have more on coverage of the inaugural prayers. Will Warren be chastised for praying as a Christian (or, as Amy Sullivan at Time calls it, “if Rick Warren gets preachy when he prays,” God forbid).”