Posts Tagged ‘Scott Ragan’

OD Today: 22 January 2009 (early edition)

January 22, 2009

Looks like everybody’s still got an inauguration hangover. The standout story is probably item 5, regarding home schooling associations and old-earth creationists. The Gerald Warner editorial is also noteworthy, since it offers a perspective from Britain saying much the same thing (but better) we’ve been hearing about what conservative Christians expect from the Obama administration.

  1. Four Pointer calls out Joseph Lowery. “The cheering crowd and the broad smile plastered on the face of Messiah Osama says it all: these are the people who are REALLY living in the past and who the REAL racists are.”
  2. Thomas Heringer is still reading Francis Schaeffer and speaking somewhat obliquely about totalitarianism. “Further, when a government says that some people can have freedom to speak and have actions they desire, but other people are not allowed to speak in opposition to those, then that itself becomes intolerant. “
  3. Jennifer O’Hara reminds us that we need to pray for our political leaders. “it includes Barack Obama, it includes all of those in authority over us. A few years ago, when Nancy Pelosi ascended…”
  4. Dwayna Litz offers a tip on dodging accusations of hate crimes. “PLEASE BE SURE WHEN WITNESSING AT TABLE TO ASK, “Is it ok with you if I read you what the Bible says?””
  5. thatmom revisits the issue of authority and dissent within the Christian home-schooling movement. “Ultimately, Sonlight received no written or full “official” explanation, but got the message: the convention committee was of the opinion that the company isn’t Christian enough . . . primarily because it isn’t strict enough in its young-earth teaching. … This has made me wonder how many more state homeschooling organizations or even Home School Legal Defense, for that matter, who is also participating in the leadership summit, are taking it upon themselves to decide who is and isn’t Christian enough to participate in conferences, conventions, and support services for homeschooling families.” See also the source post by John Holzmann. “Ultimately, Sonlight received no written or full “official” explanation, but got the message: the convention committee was of the opinion that the company isn’t Christian enough . . . primarily because it isn’t strict enough in its young-earth teaching.” Holzmann goes on to say that B. B. Warfield, J. Vernon McGee, and James Dobson were/are “old earth creationists.”
  6. Mike Ratliff continues his series that I understand to be a call to suffer during the Obama administration. “I do understand that non-Christians are not regenerate and have no concept of the Holiness of God and the sinfulness of Man. I understand that and I do not expect the US Government to become conformed to Christian values. However, since this country was founded there has been conformity to Biblical moral standards in the laws and their enforcement. The Obama administration is set to do away with all of that. This would include a reversal of all restrictions on abortion and euthanasia.
  7. Ken Silva offers a quote from John Gresham Machen (1923) and applies it to Rob Bell. Chris Rosebrough has been making essentially the same argument (that emergents are liberals with new vocabularies) via his various outlets and also recommending Machen as applying to emergents.
  8. Christine at Talk Wisdom offers another post on the Bush-Obama transition and crowd reactions. “Their ugliness was in full force yesterday, as the ObamaBorg Bot Kool-Aid drinkers in the crowd jeered and verbally bashed President George W. Bush as he entered the inaugural festivities. These people could not even be respectful enough to just KEEP QUIET if they don’t like the former president.” Interested readers who are having a hard time following the cultural references here, “Borg” refers to a collective of baddies from one of the Star Trek television franchises, not the liberal theologian of the same name, and the reference to Kool-Aid should be taken as a reference to the method of murder/suicide employed by Peoples Temple (Jonestown, Guyana), rather than an actual reference to the consumption of reconstituted soft drinks by people at the inauguration. I hope this helps.
  9. Howard Fisher links to Gerald Warner’s editorial in the Telegraph (UK) regarding the Obama inauguration. “What we are experiencing, in the deepening days of a global depression, is the desperate suspension of disbelief by people of intelligence – la trahison des clercs – in a pathetic effort to hypnotise themselves into the delusion that it will be all right on the night. It will not be all right.”
  10. Scott Ragan offers a contrary opinion regarding Sunday night services on Super Bowl Sunday. “I am not sure that this poor church was aware of the fact that by doing what they have done, they have declared their allegiance to “the gods of the NFL” and have turned their back on the God of the Bible.”
  11. Dorothy Anderson collects Emergent links regarding orthodoxy as a social construct.
  12. Steve Hays dissects federal headship (and its cousin, corporate guilt) in the age of Obama.
  13. Emergent Village offers a collection of clips from Rob Bell’s “The Gods Aren’t Angry” tour (YouTube).
  14. Christine at Talk Wisdom introduces something called Obama Schizophrenic Syndrome.
  15. Anton Hein-Hudson offers an introductory article on C. Peter Wagner/New Apostolic Reformation. Note: I finally figured out why I was incorrectly attributing Apologetics Index articles to Richard Abanes; that shouldn’t be happening again.
  16. Ingrid Schlueter has a rough night’s sleep. “The media bias for Obama has lapsed into farce. CNN is one of the worst. I think they’re on his staff. His new cabinet was called a “dream team” yesterday. Yes, a nightmare. Before the Inaugural ball, I knew they would call Michelle Obama’s gown, “stunning!” Sure enough. Yesterday morning CNN reported on her gown as being, “stunning.” If she’d worn a burlap sack, the drooling media elite would have found it to be “stunning” as well. I don’t think I can stomach this anymore.”
  17. Sharon Lindbloom offers comments on Mormon reactions in the wake of Proposition 8 and the Focus on the Family/Glenn Beck flap, reminds us all we need to be civil when dealing with Mormons. “It would be foolish to say people never cross the line when debating Mormonism vs. Christianity, but in my experience such conversations are nearly always civil and respectful.”
  18. Michael Newnham weighs in on Rick Warren’s use of the Islamic name for Jesus. “The Muslim Isa is not my Jesus…in their doctrine he was not crucified for the sins of the world but was a forerunner of Muhammad.”
  19. And finally, someone named Muammar Qaddafi recommends a “one-state solution” to the Israel/Palestinian situation (Reuters). “Assimilation is already a fact of life in Israel. There are more than one million Muslim Arabs in Israel; they possess Israeli nationality and take part in political life with the Jews, forming political parties. On the other side, there are Israeli settlements in the West Bank. Israeli factories depend on Palestinian labor, and goods and services are exchanged. This successful assimilation can be a model for Isratine.”
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OD Today: 8 January 2009 (early edition)

January 8, 2009

Not an awful lot happened overnight, but we’ve got a bunch of Ed Dobson reaction stories, a new salvo in the Jesus Wants To Save Christians review battle, and more controversy surrounding Mark Driscoll.

  1. Here’s the Ed Dobson appearance on Good Morning America; it looks for all the world like he’s there to push someone else’s book.
  2. Comments singling out the fact that Dobson kept kosher as part of his “Jesus lifestyle.” “Am I the only one who finds it ironic that gentile Christians, of whom the unclean food was a symbol are now flocking back to Kosher living? This is a perfect picture of the state of Graceless moralistic faith in general, as moralism is our attempt to make clean what God has already declared to be.”
  3. Mike Wittmer also comments on Ed Dobson “Ed’s project for the past year seems rather silly … Ed’s national admission that he frequently had beers in pubs blows a big hole through Cornerstone University’s lifestyle statement”
  4. And finally, something I rarely do: a link from the Talking Points Memo weblog about Dobson’s admission he voted for Barack Obama.

Okay. Now for the usual batch of links.

  1. Kent Hovind‘s sentence for tax evasion has been upheld.
  2. Scott Ragan links to Harold Ambler’s piece at the Huffington Post. This is the second link to this article in as many days, all about Ambler calling out Al Gore regarding global warming. “By the way, your contention that the Arctic basin will be “ice free” in summer within five years (which you said last month in Germany), is one of the most demonstrably false comments you have dared to make.”
  3. Lighthouse Trails links to a New American article in which Henry Kissinger encourages the President-Elect to pursue a new world order. “he can give new impetus to American foreign policy … I think that his task will be to develop an overall strategy for America in this period, when really a ‘new world order’ can be created. It’s a great opportunity. It isn’t such a crisis.”
  4. Lighthouse Trails copies a Warren Smith article, but I can’t find the original anywhere. “Many Christian leaders these days are so sure that what they are hearing and experiencing is from God, they are rarely testing the spirits, or even considering the possibility that they are being deceived.” Smith doesn’t name any of these leaders, etc.
  5. Jerry at CRN.Info continues his review of Jesus Wants To Save Christians, by Rob Bell and Don Golden.”Rob Bell and Don Golden continue to insist, in chapter two, Get Down Your Harps, that God is interested in a relationship with his people. In this chapter, relationship is spoken of in terms of a marriage. They also continue to insist that God’s salvation is much bigger than we sometimes want to admit-and that it has always been much bigger than the people Israel wanted to admit-that it is for all. … Some of you may wish to highlight other aspects of what they are saying, but rest assured, I did not personally pick up any hints whatsoever that this was a universal proposition guaranteeing salvation for everyone, everywhere.”
  6. Chris Lyons comments on Ewan Souter’s decision to take down his church’s crucifix: “I think that all too often we Christians become so obsessed with the cross (Jesus’ death) that we forget the true “uplifting and inspiring symbol” given to us by Jesus – the empty tomb. Perhaps, instead of adorning our churches with empty crosses – literally and sometimes figuratively – we’d be more accurate by decorating them with a stone that has been rolled away…”
  7. John Baker picks up the Ft Lauderdale Muslim protest, where some protestors called for the extermination of the Jews.

And now, a complicated trail regarding Mark Dricoll’s comments on Jesus the Evangelist:

  1. Mark Driscoll’s original comments: “the fact that Jesus remains to this day an active evangelist is of great encouragement to me personally. It means that children who are aborted in the womb, those mentally incapable of understanding the gospel, and those people who have lived in times and places that missionaries did not visit are not necessarily beyond the hope of salvation. Indeed, Jesus could visit and save anyone anywhere because He remains The Evangelist.”
  2. Timmy Brister parses these comments: “what is so confusing to me is that Driscoll’s response could be taken potentially all three ways:  (1) post-mortem evangelism because Jesus will “evangelize” them Himself, presumably after they die; (2) a variation of inclusivism; or (3) a form of soft exclusivism where Jesus reveals Himself to people in dreams or visions savingly.  I am inclined that, given Driscoll’s charismatic beliefs (or mysticism) and theological influences, he would likely be in the third category. … Inasmuch as Driscoll hopes that the unevangelized will be evangelized by Jesus, I hope that the unevangelized will also be discipled by Jesus because there will be no one around to do that work. … ironically, creates a divide between Christ and His Great Commission.”
  3. Puritan Reformed offers abbreviated comments: “Barring the mentally handicapped and the unborn, the mention of unreached peoples and people groups is very troubling. Is the Gospel necessary unto salvation, or can salvation be mediated by some sort of supernatural encounter apart from the Scriptures and cognitive belief in Christ? Something stinks over in the New Calvinist camp, that’s for sure.”